Fwd: FW: The "Mighty MO"

       These photos don’t just display the history of a ship.

They also display those Americans who laid down their

lives to protect the USA just as they do today.

This is                                                           the USS                                                           Missouri                                                           BB-63                                                           better known                                                           as                                                           Mighty                                                           Mo

This is the USS Missouri (BB-63),

better known as “Mighty Mo”.

From a                                                           historical                                                           perspective                                                           the USS                                                           Missouri is                                                           arguably one                                                           of the most                                                           famous ships                                                           the world has                                                           ever seen                                                           Lets begin                                                           with an                                                           over-view of                                                           some of her                                                           many feats

From a historical perspective, the USS Missouri is arguably

one of the most famous ships the world has ever seen.

Let’s begin with an over-view of some of her many feats.

The photo                                                           above is of                                                           the USS                                                           Oklahoma                                                           During the                                                           Japanese                                                           attack on                                                           Pearl Harbor                                                           the Oklahoma                                                           was sunk by                                                           several bombs                                                           and torpedoes                                                           A total of 429                                                           crew died when                                                           the ship                                                           capsized                                                           Following the                                                           bombing of                                                           Pearl Harbor                                                           the Navy began                                                           building the                                                           USS Missouri                                                           to battle                                                           Japan in the                                                           Pacific She                                                           was                                                           commissioned                                                           for service in                                                           1944 and is                                                           the last of                                                           the iconic                                                           Iowa-class                                                           battleships                                                           ever built

The photo above is of the USS Oklahoma.

During the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor,

the Oklahoma was sunk by several bombs and torpedoes.

A total of 429 crew died when the ship capsized.

Following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the Navy began building

the USS Missouri to battle Japan in the Pacific.

She was commissioned for service in 1944 and is the last

of the iconic Iowa-class battleships ever built.

In the                                                           Pacific                                                           Theater BB-63                                                           fought in the                                                           battles of Iwo                                                           Jima and                                                           Okinawa

In the Pacific Theater,

BB-63 fought in the battles of Iwo Jima and Okinawa.

The                                                           Iowa-class                                                           battleships                                                           were literally                                                           armed to                                                           the                                                           teeth                                                           They had 9 big                                                           guns named                                                           the Mark                                                           7 which                                                           were 16 inches                                                           in diameter                                                           and fired                                                           2700 pound                                                           shells that                                                           could travel a                                                           distance of 20                                                           miles

The Iowa-class battleships were literally “armed to the teeth.”

They had 9 16"/50 caliber Mark 7 Naval rifles,

which were 16 inches in diameter and fired

2,700 pound shells that could travel a distance of 20 miles.

In                                                           addition they                                                           carried 20                                                           Mark                                                           12 guns                                                           that could hit                                                           a target 10                                                           miles away

In addition they carried 20 5"/38 “Mark 12” guns

that could hit a target 10 miles away.

For                                                           anti-aircraft                                                           protection                                                           they had two                                                           types of guns                                                           There were 49                                                           of the smaller                                                           20                                                           millimeterOerlikon                                                           guns and 80                                                           larger 40mm                                                           Borfors                                                           guns

For anti-aircraft protection, they had two types of guns.

There were 49 of the smaller 20 millimeter “Oerlikon” guns

and 80 larger 40mm “Borfors” guns.

From WW2                                                           Mighty                                                           Mo went                                                           on to serve in                                                           the Korean War                                                           from 1950 to                                                           1953

From WW2, “Mighty Mo” went on to serve in the Korean War

from 1950 to 1953.

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In 1984                                                           she was                                                           modernized to                                                           carrier                                                           Tomahawk                                                           cruise                                                           missiles along                                                           with up-dated                                                           air defense                                                           systems

In 1984, she was modernized to carrier Tomahawk cruise

missiles along with up-dated air defense systems.

Forty-seven years after her commissioning in 1991 the USS Missouri                                                           was modernized                                                           and sent to                                                           battle Iraq                                                           inOperation                                                           Desert                                                           Storm

Forty-seven years after her commissioning, in 1991

the USS Missouri was modernized and sent to battle Iraq

in “Operation Desert Storm”.

The ol                                                           beast fired                                                           multiple                                                           Tomahawk                                                           cruise                                                           missiles at                                                           Iraqi                                                           targets

The ol’ beast fired multiple Tomahawk cruise missiles at Iraqi targets.

Her final                                                           resting place                                                           came in 1998                                                           where the                                                           Missouri has                                                           been honored                                                           as a museum                                                           ship at                                                           Foxtrot 5 Pier                                                           on Ford Island                                                           in Pearl                                                           Harbor

Her final resting place came in 1998, where the Missouri has been

honored as a museum ship at Foxtrot 5 Pier on Ford Island in Pearl Harbor.

These                                                           achievements                                                           over such a                                                           long period of                                                           time are                                                           amazing but it                                                           is one other                                                           event in which                                                           history will                                                           forever                                                           remember this                                                           ship

These achievements over such a long period of time are amazing

but it is one other event in which history will forever remember this ship.

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On this ship the Empire of Japan officially surrendered,

bringing a final closure to World War 2.

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However                                                           the real story                                                           involves none                                                           of these                                                           achievements                                                           In fact this                                                           is not a story                                                           about a                                                           weapon This                                                           is an                                                           inspirational                                                           story about                                                           the human side                                                           of War

However the real story involves none of these achievements.

In fact, this is not a story about a weapon.

This is an inspirational story about the human side of War.

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One of the scariest tactics of WW2 came from the Kamikaze.

Takijiro Onishi was an admiral in the Imperial Japanese Navy

during World War 2.

He set up the first Special Attack Unit, Kamikaze unit, near Manila

(the capital city of the Philippine Islands)

as the certainty of a U.S. invasion became unavoidable.

In his own words,

“I don’t think there would be any other certain way to carry

out the operation (to hold the Philippines),

than to put a 250 kg bomb on a Zero and let it crash into a U.S. carrier,

in order to disable her for a week.”

In total                                                           2800 Kamikaze                                                           attack planes                                                           were sent on                                                           their one-way                                                           missions

In total 2,800 Kamikaze attack planes were sent on their one-way missions.

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They                                                           damaged 368                                                           ships

They damaged 368 ships.

34 other                                                           ships were                                                           completely                                                           sunk

34 other ships were completely sunk.

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MG                                                           machine gun                                                           from a crashed                                                           Kamikaze gets                                                           lodged in the                                                           barrel of                                                           Naval Borfors                                                           gun

MG machine gun from a crashed Kamikaze gets lodged

in the barrel of Naval Borfors gun.

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The                                                           attacks                                                           accounted for                                                           over 4800                                                           wounded                                                           sailors and                                                           4900 deaths

The attacks accounted for over 4,800 wounded sailors and 4,900 deaths.

This was                                                           the terrifying                                                           reality of war                                                           in the                                                           Pacific

This was the terrifying reality of war in the Pacific.

Here is                                                           where the                                                           story begins                                                           Below are                                                           images of the                                                           USS Missouri                                                           battling in                                                           coming                                                           Japanese                                                           Kamikaze                                                           Zeroes

Here is where the story begins.

Below are images of the USS Missouri battling incoming

Japanese Kamikaze “Zeroes”.

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On April 11th of 1945 while fighting off incoming Kamikazes

during the battle for Okinawa, a sailor nicknamed

“Buster” Campbell was hanging out with the ship’s photographer

and caught the following unforgettable photo just before a

Zero hit the side of the ship.

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The                                                           remains of the                                                           pilot were                                                           found among                                                           the wreckage                                                           To which the                                                           Missouris                                                           Captain                                                           William                                                           Callaghan                                                           pictured on                                                           the left                                                           ordered the                                                           burial of the                                                           unknown                                                           Japanese pilot                                                           the following                                                           day

The remains of the pilot were found among the wreckage.

To which the Missouri’s Captain, William Callaghan (pictured on the left),

ordered the burial of the unknown Japanese pilot the following day.

At 9am                                                           the following                                                           morning of                                                           April 12th                                                           1945 in waters                                                           northeast of                                                           Okinawa as                                                           the last major                                                           battle of                                                           World War 2                                                           raged at both                                                           sea and                                                           ashore the                                                           body of a                                                           Japanese pilot                                                           is readied for                                                           burial at sea                                                           The pilots                                                           body was                                                           placed in a                                                           canvas shroud                                                           and draped                                                           with a                                                           Japanese flag                                                           sewn by the                                                           Missouri crew                                                           Sailors then                                                           stood by as                                                           the                                                           flag-draped                                                           body was                                                           brought on                                                           deck from                                                           sickbay and                                                           carried by a                                                           6-man burial                                                           detail toward                                                           the rail near                                                           to the point                                                           of impact                                                           Those present                                                           come to                                                           attention and                                                           offered a                                                           hand-salute as                                                           the Marine                                                           rifle detail                                                           aimed their                                                           weapons                                                           skyward to                                                           render a                                                           three-volley                                                           salute over                                                           the remains                                                           Then a member                                                           of the ships                                                           bandsmen                                                           stepped                                                           forward with                                                           his bugle and                                                           played                                                           Taps                                                           Finally the                                                           Senior                                                           Chaplain                                                           Commander                                                           Roland Faulk                                                           concluded the                                                           ceremony by                                                           saying the                                                           following                                                           we                                                           commit his                                                           body to the                                                           deepThe                                                           burial detail                                                           then lifted                                                           the                                                           flag-draped                                                           fallen pilot                                                           over the side                                                           and into his                                                           final resting                                                           place of the                                                           Pacific                                                           Ocean

At 9am the following morning of April 12th, 1945 in waters

northeast of Okinawa, as the last major battle of World War 2

raged at both sea and ashore, the body of a Japanese pilot

is readied for burial at sea.

The pilot’s body was placed in a canvas shroud and draped

with a Japanese flag sewn by the Missouri crew.

Sailors then stood by as the flag-draped body was brought on

deck from sickbay and carried by a 6-man burial detail toward

the rail near to the point of impact.

Those present came to attention and offered a hand-salute as the

Marine rifle detail aimed their weapons skyward to render a

three-volley salute over the remains.

Then a member of the ship’s bandsmen stepped forward with

his bugle and played “Taps.”

Finally the Senior Chaplain, Commander Roland Faulk,

concluded the ceremony by saying the following,

“we commit his body to the deep”.

The burial detail then lifted the flag-draped fallen pilot over

the side and into his final resting place of the Pacific Ocean.

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To this                                                           day the bent                                                           side-railing                                                           was never                                                           replaced in                                                           memory of the                                                           Kamikaze                                                           attack

To this day, the bent side-railing was never replaced

in memory of the Kamikaze attack.

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The                                                           lodged                                                           Kamikaze gun                                                           was from the                                                           USS Missouri                                                           crash

The lodged Kamikaze gun was from the USS Missouri crash.

These are                                                           the remains                                                           kept of the                                                           Japanese                                                           pilot The                                                           gold button is                                                           believed to                                                           have come from                                                           the uniform of                                                           the pilot

These are the remains kept of the Japanese pilot.

The gold button is believed to have come from the uniform of the pilot.

In 1945                                                           the official                                                           Allied                                                           reporting name                                                           for the                                                           Mitsubishi A6M                                                           Zero was                                                           Zeke                                                           which later                                                           became                                                           commonly known                                                           as the                                                           Zero

In 1945, the official Allied reporting name for the

Mitsubishi A6M Zero was “Zeke” which later became

commonly known as the “Zero”.

The                                                           Kamikaze pilot                                                           had a family                                                           and a name                                                           This was                                                           Setsuo                                                           Ishino

The Kamikaze pilot had a family and a name.

This was Setsuo Ishino.

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On November 26th of 1944, after the Essex-class aircraft carrier

USS Intrepid (CV-11) was struck by 2 Kamikazes which killed

6 Officers and 59 of it’s crew.

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Photoed                                                           above are                                                           Kamikaze                                                           pilots in May                                                           of 1945 They                                                           never                                                           returned just                                                           months before                                                           the war ended                                                           Below is an                                                           old man named                                                           Hishashi                                                           Tezuka He was                                                           a kamikaze                                                           pilot that                                                           would survive                                                           because the                                                           war ended

Photoed above are Kamikaze pilots in May of 1945.

They never returned, just months before the war ended.

Below is an old man named Hishashi Tezuka.

He was a kamikaze pilot that would survive because the war ended.

War is                                                           hell Thank                                                           you to our                                                           greatest                                                           generation                                                           Thank you to                                                           those out                                                           there serving                                                           today

War is hell.

Thank you to our greatest generation.

Thank you to those out there serving today.

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… the “Big Mo” is shown with a bronze of Admiral Chester Nimitz, the leader who won the war in the Pacific

 

 




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Don't worry...be happy!

The Battle Of Athens, Tennessee

To those who say this couldn't happen today, true, not as depicted in this film.  Today's charletons are more subtle but the results are just as corrupt.

 These days they weaponize the I.R.S. and corrupt F.B.I. agents, are joined by a complicit MSM who quote eloquent speakers as gods.

 No wonder so many "swamp dwellers"  fight 'draining the swamp'!

 This is a film production, but the incident really did happen. Athens is about 20 or 25 miles north Cleveland, Tenn.

Watch this short video to the end. This is the real reason why we have the 2nd Amendment to the Constitution of the United States.