tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:/posts The Para-Rigger 2018-04-19T19:04:03Z tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1274693 2018-04-19T19:04:02Z 2018-04-19T19:04:03Z The Saga Of Chris "Wildman" Magee Hero, Fighter Ace, Bank Robber

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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1274137 2018-04-18T09:27:52Z 2018-04-18T09:27:52Z Some Really Bad-A-- Cucumber Harvesting Going On Here!
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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1274077 2018-04-18T01:17:52Z 2018-04-18T01:17:52Z Mussolini's 1:240 Model of Ancient Rome At Its Peak

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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1272035 2018-04-13T00:35:38Z 2018-04-13T15:57:05Z How a typo helped end World War II

https://www.inspiremore.com/geoffrey-tandy-wwii-typo/

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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1271960 2018-04-12T21:05:30Z 2018-04-12T21:05:30Z Jumbo: General Groves' Twelve Million Dollar, 200 Ton White Elephant
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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1271409 2018-04-11T14:59:21Z 2018-04-11T15:05:36Z Olive Dennis - a Great Engineer
https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/olive-dennis-train-comfort-engineer

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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1271048 2018-04-10T15:46:58Z 2018-04-10T15:46:58Z The Mysterious Last Battle of a Soviet Tank General
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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1270334 2018-04-08T18:20:05Z 2018-04-09T19:13:57Z Fwd: FW: The "Mighty MO"

       These photos don’t just display the history of a ship.

They also display those Americans who laid down their

lives to protect the USA just as they do today.

This is                                                           the USS                                                           Missouri                                                           BB-63                                                           better known                                                           as                                                           Mighty                                                           Mo

This is the USS Missouri (BB-63),

better known as “Mighty Mo”.

From a                                                           historical                                                           perspective                                                           the USS                                                           Missouri is                                                           arguably one                                                           of the most                                                           famous ships                                                           the world has                                                           ever seen                                                           Lets begin                                                           with an                                                           over-view of                                                           some of her                                                           many feats

From a historical perspective, the USS Missouri is arguably

one of the most famous ships the world has ever seen.

Let’s begin with an over-view of some of her many feats.

The photo                                                           above is of                                                           the USS                                                           Oklahoma                                                           During the                                                           Japanese                                                           attack on                                                           Pearl Harbor                                                           the Oklahoma                                                           was sunk by                                                           several bombs                                                           and torpedoes                                                           A total of 429                                                           crew died when                                                           the ship                                                           capsized                                                           Following the                                                           bombing of                                                           Pearl Harbor                                                           the Navy began                                                           building the                                                           USS Missouri                                                           to battle                                                           Japan in the                                                           Pacific She                                                           was                                                           commissioned                                                           for service in                                                           1944 and is                                                           the last of                                                           the iconic                                                           Iowa-class                                                           battleships                                                           ever built

The photo above is of the USS Oklahoma.

During the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor,

the Oklahoma was sunk by several bombs and torpedoes.

A total of 429 crew died when the ship capsized.

Following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the Navy began building

the USS Missouri to battle Japan in the Pacific.

She was commissioned for service in 1944 and is the last

of the iconic Iowa-class battleships ever built.

In the                                                           Pacific                                                           Theater BB-63                                                           fought in the                                                           battles of Iwo                                                           Jima and                                                           Okinawa

In the Pacific Theater,

BB-63 fought in the battles of Iwo Jima and Okinawa.

The                                                           Iowa-class                                                           battleships                                                           were literally                                                           armed to                                                           the                                                           teeth                                                           They had 9 big                                                           guns named                                                           the Mark                                                           7 which                                                           were 16 inches                                                           in diameter                                                           and fired                                                           2700 pound                                                           shells that                                                           could travel a                                                           distance of 20                                                           miles

The Iowa-class battleships were literally “armed to the teeth.”

They had 9 16"/50 caliber Mark 7 Naval rifles,

which were 16 inches in diameter and fired

2,700 pound shells that could travel a distance of 20 miles.

In                                                           addition they                                                           carried 20                                                           Mark                                                           12 guns                                                           that could hit                                                           a target 10                                                           miles away

In addition they carried 20 5"/38 “Mark 12” guns

that could hit a target 10 miles away.

For                                                           anti-aircraft                                                           protection                                                           they had two                                                           types of guns                                                           There were 49                                                           of the smaller                                                           20                                                           millimeterOerlikon                                                           guns and 80                                                           larger 40mm                                                           Borfors                                                           guns

For anti-aircraft protection, they had two types of guns.

There were 49 of the smaller 20 millimeter “Oerlikon” guns

and 80 larger 40mm “Borfors” guns.

From WW2                                                           Mighty                                                           Mo went                                                           on to serve in                                                           the Korean War                                                           from 1950 to                                                           1953

From WW2, “Mighty Mo” went on to serve in the Korean War

from 1950 to 1953.

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In 1984                                                           she was                                                           modernized to                                                           carrier                                                           Tomahawk                                                           cruise                                                           missiles along                                                           with up-dated                                                           air defense                                                           systems

In 1984, she was modernized to carrier Tomahawk cruise

missiles along with up-dated air defense systems.

Forty-seven years after her commissioning in 1991 the USS Missouri                                                           was modernized                                                           and sent to                                                           battle Iraq                                                           inOperation                                                           Desert                                                           Storm

Forty-seven years after her commissioning, in 1991

the USS Missouri was modernized and sent to battle Iraq

in “Operation Desert Storm”.

The ol                                                           beast fired                                                           multiple                                                           Tomahawk                                                           cruise                                                           missiles at                                                           Iraqi                                                           targets

The ol’ beast fired multiple Tomahawk cruise missiles at Iraqi targets.

Her final                                                           resting place                                                           came in 1998                                                           where the                                                           Missouri has                                                           been honored                                                           as a museum                                                           ship at                                                           Foxtrot 5 Pier                                                           on Ford Island                                                           in Pearl                                                           Harbor

Her final resting place came in 1998, where the Missouri has been

honored as a museum ship at Foxtrot 5 Pier on Ford Island in Pearl Harbor.

These                                                           achievements                                                           over such a                                                           long period of                                                           time are                                                           amazing but it                                                           is one other                                                           event in which                                                           history will                                                           forever                                                           remember this                                                           ship

These achievements over such a long period of time are amazing

but it is one other event in which history will forever remember this ship.

httpsthechivefileswordpresscom201605b-kamikaze-uss-missouri-600-7jpgquality85stripinfow900

On this ship the Empire of Japan officially surrendered,

bringing a final closure to World War 2.

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However                                                           the real story                                                           involves none                                                           of these                                                           achievements                                                           In fact this                                                           is not a story                                                           about a                                                           weapon This                                                           is an                                                           inspirational                                                           story about                                                           the human side                                                           of War

However the real story involves none of these achievements.

In fact, this is not a story about a weapon.

This is an inspirational story about the human side of War.

httpsthechivefileswordpresscom201605c-kamikaze-uss-missouri-600-0jpgquality85stripinfow900

One of the scariest tactics of WW2 came from the Kamikaze.

Takijiro Onishi was an admiral in the Imperial Japanese Navy

during World War 2.

He set up the first Special Attack Unit, Kamikaze unit, near Manila

(the capital city of the Philippine Islands)

as the certainty of a U.S. invasion became unavoidable.

In his own words,

“I don’t think there would be any other certain way to carry

out the operation (to hold the Philippines),

than to put a 250 kg bomb on a Zero and let it crash into a U.S. carrier,

in order to disable her for a week.”

In total                                                           2800 Kamikaze                                                           attack planes                                                           were sent on                                                           their one-way                                                           missions

In total 2,800 Kamikaze attack planes were sent on their one-way missions.

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They                                                           damaged 368                                                           ships

They damaged 368 ships.

34 other                                                           ships were                                                           completely                                                           sunk

34 other ships were completely sunk.

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MG                                                           machine gun                                                           from a crashed                                                           Kamikaze gets                                                           lodged in the                                                           barrel of                                                           Naval Borfors                                                           gun

MG machine gun from a crashed Kamikaze gets lodged

in the barrel of Naval Borfors gun.

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The                                                           attacks                                                           accounted for                                                           over 4800                                                           wounded                                                           sailors and                                                           4900 deaths

The attacks accounted for over 4,800 wounded sailors and 4,900 deaths.

This was                                                           the terrifying                                                           reality of war                                                           in the                                                           Pacific

This was the terrifying reality of war in the Pacific.

Here is                                                           where the                                                           story begins                                                           Below are                                                           images of the                                                           USS Missouri                                                           battling in                                                           coming                                                           Japanese                                                           Kamikaze                                                           Zeroes

Here is where the story begins.

Below are images of the USS Missouri battling incoming

Japanese Kamikaze “Zeroes”.

httpsthechivefileswordpresscom201605e-kamikaze-uss-missouri-600-3jpgquality85stripinfow900

On April 11th of 1945 while fighting off incoming Kamikazes

during the battle for Okinawa, a sailor nicknamed

“Buster” Campbell was hanging out with the ship’s photographer

and caught the following unforgettable photo just before a

Zero hit the side of the ship.

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The                                                           remains of the                                                           pilot were                                                           found among                                                           the wreckage                                                           To which the                                                           Missouris                                                           Captain                                                           William                                                           Callaghan                                                           pictured on                                                           the left                                                           ordered the                                                           burial of the                                                           unknown                                                           Japanese pilot                                                           the following                                                           day

The remains of the pilot were found among the wreckage.

To which the Missouri’s Captain, William Callaghan (pictured on the left),

ordered the burial of the unknown Japanese pilot the following day.

At 9am                                                           the following                                                           morning of                                                           April 12th                                                           1945 in waters                                                           northeast of                                                           Okinawa as                                                           the last major                                                           battle of                                                           World War 2                                                           raged at both                                                           sea and                                                           ashore the                                                           body of a                                                           Japanese pilot                                                           is readied for                                                           burial at sea                                                           The pilots                                                           body was                                                           placed in a                                                           canvas shroud                                                           and draped                                                           with a                                                           Japanese flag                                                           sewn by the                                                           Missouri crew                                                           Sailors then                                                           stood by as                                                           the                                                           flag-draped                                                           body was                                                           brought on                                                           deck from                                                           sickbay and                                                           carried by a                                                           6-man burial                                                           detail toward                                                           the rail near                                                           to the point                                                           of impact                                                           Those present                                                           come to                                                           attention and                                                           offered a                                                           hand-salute as                                                           the Marine                                                           rifle detail                                                           aimed their                                                           weapons                                                           skyward to                                                           render a                                                           three-volley                                                           salute over                                                           the remains                                                           Then a member                                                           of the ships                                                           bandsmen                                                           stepped                                                           forward with                                                           his bugle and                                                           played                                                           Taps                                                           Finally the                                                           Senior                                                           Chaplain                                                           Commander                                                           Roland Faulk                                                           concluded the                                                           ceremony by                                                           saying the                                                           following                                                           we                                                           commit his                                                           body to the                                                           deepThe                                                           burial detail                                                           then lifted                                                           the                                                           flag-draped                                                           fallen pilot                                                           over the side                                                           and into his                                                           final resting                                                           place of the                                                           Pacific                                                           Ocean

At 9am the following morning of April 12th, 1945 in waters

northeast of Okinawa, as the last major battle of World War 2

raged at both sea and ashore, the body of a Japanese pilot

is readied for burial at sea.

The pilot’s body was placed in a canvas shroud and draped

with a Japanese flag sewn by the Missouri crew.

Sailors then stood by as the flag-draped body was brought on

deck from sickbay and carried by a 6-man burial detail toward

the rail near to the point of impact.

Those present came to attention and offered a hand-salute as the

Marine rifle detail aimed their weapons skyward to render a

three-volley salute over the remains.

Then a member of the ship’s bandsmen stepped forward with

his bugle and played “Taps.”

Finally the Senior Chaplain, Commander Roland Faulk,

concluded the ceremony by saying the following,

“we commit his body to the deep”.

The burial detail then lifted the flag-draped fallen pilot over

the side and into his final resting place of the Pacific Ocean.

f-Kamikaze-USS-Missouri-600-2

To this                                                           day the bent                                                           side-railing                                                           was never                                                           replaced in                                                           memory of the                                                           Kamikaze                                                           attack

To this day, the bent side-railing was never replaced

in memory of the Kamikaze attack.

e-Kamikaze-USS-Missouri-600-4

The                                                           lodged                                                           Kamikaze gun                                                           was from the                                                           USS Missouri                                                           crash

The lodged Kamikaze gun was from the USS Missouri crash.

These are                                                           the remains                                                           kept of the                                                           Japanese                                                           pilot The                                                           gold button is                                                           believed to                                                           have come from                                                           the uniform of                                                           the pilot

These are the remains kept of the Japanese pilot.

The gold button is believed to have come from the uniform of the pilot.

In 1945                                                           the official                                                           Allied                                                           reporting name                                                           for the                                                           Mitsubishi A6M                                                           Zero was                                                           Zeke                                                           which later                                                           became                                                           commonly known                                                           as the                                                           Zero

In 1945, the official Allied reporting name for the

Mitsubishi A6M Zero was “Zeke” which later became

commonly known as the “Zero”.

The                                                           Kamikaze pilot                                                           had a family                                                           and a name                                                           This was                                                           Setsuo                                                           Ishino

The Kamikaze pilot had a family and a name.

This was Setsuo Ishino.

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f-Kamikaze-USS-Missouri-600-11

f-Kamikaze-USS-Missouri-600-3

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On November 26th of 1944, after the Essex-class aircraft carrier

USS Intrepid (CV-11) was struck by 2 Kamikazes which killed

6 Officers and 59 of it’s crew.

f-Kamikaze-USS-Missouri-600-17

Photoed                                                           above are                                                           Kamikaze                                                           pilots in May                                                           of 1945 They                                                           never                                                           returned just                                                           months before                                                           the war ended                                                           Below is an                                                           old man named                                                           Hishashi                                                           Tezuka He was                                                           a kamikaze                                                           pilot that                                                           would survive                                                           because the                                                           war ended

Photoed above are Kamikaze pilots in May of 1945.

They never returned, just months before the war ended.

Below is an old man named Hishashi Tezuka.

He was a kamikaze pilot that would survive because the war ended.

War is                                                           hell Thank                                                           you to our                                                           greatest                                                           generation                                                           Thank you to                                                           those out                                                           there serving                                                           today

War is hell.

Thank you to our greatest generation.

Thank you to those out there serving today.

z4-Kamikaze-USS-Missouri-600-3

… the “Big Mo” is shown with a bronze of Admiral Chester Nimitz, the leader who won the war in the Pacific

 

 




--

Don't worry...be happy!

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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1269591 2018-04-06T15:43:14Z 2018-04-07T15:57:17Z The Battle Of Athens, Tennessee

To those who say this couldn't happen today, true, not as depicted in this film.  Today's charletons are more subtle but the results are just as corrupt.

 These days they weaponize the I.R.S. and corrupt F.B.I. agents, are joined by a complicit MSM who quote eloquent speakers as gods.

 No wonder so many "swamp dwellers"  fight 'draining the swamp'!

 This is a film production, but the incident really did happen. Athens is about 20 or 25 miles north Cleveland, Tenn.

Watch this short video to the end. This is the real reason why we have the 2nd Amendment to the Constitution of the United States.

http://voxvocispublicus.homestead.com/Battle-of-Athens.html 

​ Image result for battle of athens tennessee ​

 

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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1269457 2018-04-06T05:39:30Z 2018-04-06T05:39:31Z Who owns 221B Baker Street today?

https://qz.com/1245110/the-unsolved-mystery-of-who-owns-sherlock-holmes-130-million-home/

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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1269381 2018-04-05T23:50:54Z 2018-04-05T23:52:35Z Historical old photos
Historical photos.....
 
Below are some fascinating old photographs.


1903__080814
A 10 x 15-foot wooden shed where the Harley-Davidson Motor Company started out in 19031912__080814
Testing football helmets in 1912
1920__080814
A bar in New York City, the night before prohibition began,1920
1920s__080814
Mount Rushmore Before Carving, 1920s
1923_080814
Traffic jam in New York, 1923
1926_080814
A quiet little job at a crocodile farm in St. Augustine, Florida
1929__080814
World economic crisis, 1929
1930__080814
Central Park in 1930
1930B__080814
Last four couples standing at a Chicago dance marathon, ca. 1930
1930c
Meeting of the Mickey Mouse Club, early 1930s
1938__080814
Confederate and Union soldiers shake hands across the wall at the 1938 reunion for the Veterans of the Battle of Gettysburg
1939_080814
When they realized women were using their sacks to make clothes for their children, flour mills of the 30s started using flowered fabric for their sacks, 1939
1940_080814
NY, Coney Island, 1940
1942__080814
The thirty-six men needed to fly and service a B-17E in 1942
1949__080814
Three young women wash their clothes in Central Park during a water shortage. New York, 19491951_080814
19 year-old Shigeki Tanaka was a survivor of the bombing of Hiroshima and went on to win the
1951 Boston Marathon. The crowd was silent as he crossed the finish line. Tanaka was not
exactly a survivor of the bombing of Hiroshima. When the bomb was dropped, he was at
home, about 20 miles from the site. He saw a light and heard a distant rumble, but was personally unaffected by the bomb.
1955__080814
Florida’s last Civil War veteran, Bill Lundy, poses with a jet fighter, 1955
1960s_100814
NASA scientists with their board of calculations, 1960s
1969_080814
New York firemen play a game after a fire in a billiard parlor, 1969
1971_080814
An abandoned baby sleeps peacefully in a drawer at the Los Angeles Police Station, 1971
1972_080814
Boy hiding in a TV set. Boston, 1972 by Arthur Tress
1974__080814
A spectator holds up a sign at the Academy Awards, April 1974
1975_080814
Robert De Niro’s cab driver license. In order to get into character for the film Taxi Driver, he obtained his own hack license and would pick-up/drive customers around in New York City.
1985_080814
Ronald Reagan wearing sweatpants on Air Force One, 1985

A boxing match on board the USS Oregon in 1897       

An airman being captured by Vietnamese in Truc Bach Lake, Hanoi in 1967.

The airman is John McCain.     
Samurai warriors taken between 1860 and 1880     
A shell-shocked reindeer looks on as war planes drop bombs on Russia in 1941.     
Walt Disney on the day they opened Disney Studios
The Microsoft staff in 1978     
The last known Tasmanian Tiger (now extinct) photographed in 1933     
German air raid on Moscow in 1941     
Winston Churchill out for a swim     
The London sky after a bombing and dogfight between British and German planes in 1940       
Martin Luther King, Jr removes a burned cross from his yard in 1960. The boy is his son.         ;
Google begins.     
Nagasaki , 20 minutes after the atomic bombing in 1945     
The only photograph of a living Quagga (now extinct) from 1870     
Hitler’s bunker     
A Japanese plane is shot down during the Battle of Saipan in 1944.     
The original Ronald McDonald played by Willard Scott     
The first photo taken from space in 1946     
British SAS back from a 3-month patrol of North Africa in 1943     
Disneyland employee cafeteria in 1961     
The first McDonalds     
Fidel Castro lays a wreath at the Lincoln Memorial.     
George S. Patton?s dog mourning his master on the day of his death.     
California lumberjacks working on Redwoods     
Construction of the Berlin Wall in 1961     
Bread and soup during the Great Depression     
The 1912 World Series     
The first photo following the discovery of Machu Pichu in 1912.     
Construction of Christ the Redeemer in Rio da Janeiro, Brazil     
Steamboats on the Mississippi River in 1907     
Leo Tolstoy telling a story to his grandchildren in 1909    ;  
The construction of Disneyland     
Arnold Schwarzenegger on the day he received his American citizenship     
14-year-old Osama bin Laden (2nd from the right)     
Construction of the Statue of Liberty in 1884     
Albert Einstein’s office photographed on the day of his death     
A liberated Jew holds a Nazi guard at gunpoint.     
Construction of the Manhattan Bridge in 1908     
Construction of the Eiffel Tower in 1888     
Dismantling of the Berlin Wall in 1989     
Titanic leaves port in 1912.     
Adolf Hitler’s pants after the failed assassination attempt at Wolf?s Lair in 1944       
ENIAC, the first computer ever built     
Brighton Swimming Club in 1863     
Ferdinand Porsche showing a model of the Volkswagen Beetle to Adolf Hitler in 1935  
The unbroken seal on King Tut’s tomb     
Apollo 16 astronaut Charles Duke left this family photo behind on the moon in 1972.     
The crew of Apollo 1 practicing their water landing in 1966. Unfortunately, all of them were killed on the launch pad in a fire.       
An aircraft crash on board during World War II 
Henry Ford, Thomas Edison, Warren G. Harding (29th president of USA ), and Harvey Samuel Firestone (founder of Firestone Tire and Rubber Co.) talking together     
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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1268844 2018-04-04T15:22:44Z 2018-04-04T15:22:44Z Military secrets

http://www.doyletics.com/tidbits/militaryadvice.pdf

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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1268306 2018-04-03T01:15:26Z 2018-04-03T01:23:57Z L'affaire Wax

Notes & Comments April 2018

Fahrenheit 451 updated

What took them so long? That was our first question when we heard the latest news about the distinguished University of Pennsylvania law professor Amy Wax. Last summer, Professor Wax created a minor disturbance in the force of politically correct groupthink when she co-authored an op-ed for The Philadelphia Inquirer titled “Paying the price for breakdown of the country’s bourgeois culture.”

What, a college professor arguing in favor of “bourgeois” values? Mirabile dictu, yes. Professor Wax and her co-author, Professor Larry Alexander from the University of San Diego, argued not only that the “bourgeois” values regnant in American society in the 1950s were beneficial to society as a whole, but also that they were potent aides to disadvantaged individuals seeking to better themselves economically and socially. “Get married before you have children and strive to stay married for their sake,” Professors Wax and Alexander advised.

Get the education you need for gainful employment, work hard, and avoid idleness. Go the extra mile for your employer or client. Be a patriot, ready to serve the country. Be neighborly, civic-minded, and charitable. Avoid coarse language in public. Be respectful of authority. Eschew substance abuse and crime.

Such homely advice rankled, of course. Imagine telling the professoriate to be patriotic, to work hard, to be civic-minded or charitable. Quelle horreur!

Wax and Alexander were roundly condemned by their university colleagues. Thirty-three of Wax’s fellow law professors at Penn signed an “Open Letter” condemning her op-ed. “We categorically reject Wax’s claims,” they thundered.

What they found especially egregious was Wax and Alexander’s observation that “All cultures are not equal.” That hissing noise you hear is the sharp intake of breath at the utterance of such a sentiment. The tort was compounded by Wax’s later statements in an interview that “Everyone wants to go to countries ruled by white Europeans” because “Anglo-Protestant cultural norms are superior.”

Can you believe it? Professor Wax actually had the temerity to utter this plain, irrefragable, impolitic truth. Everyone knows this to be the case. As William Henry argued back in the 1990s in his undeservedly neglected book In Defense of Elitism, “the simple fact [is] that some people are better than others—smarter, harder working, more learned, more productive, harder to replace.” Moreover, Henry continued, “Some ideas are better than others, some values more enduring, some works of art more universal.” And it follows, he concluded, that “Some cultures, though we dare not say it, are more accomplished than others and therefore more worthy of study. Every corner of the human race may have something to contribute. That does not mean that all contributions are equal. . . . It is scarcely the same thing to put a man on the moon as to put a bone in your nose.”

True, too true. But in a pusillanimous society terrified by its own shadow, it is one thing to know the truth, quite another to utter it in public.

For his part, Theodore Ruger, the Dean of Penn Law School, tried to have it both ways. He didn’t, on that occasion, discipline Professor Wax or seek to revoke her tenure. But he hastened to disparage her observation as “divisive, even noxious,” and to “state my own personal view that as a scholar and educator I reject emphatically any claim that a single cultural tradition is better than all others.”

What a brave man is Ted Ruger. Uriah Heep would have been proud.

There were other efflorescences of outrage directed at Professors Wax and Alexander last autumn. But since the metabolism of outrage and victimhood is voracious as well as predatory, fresh objects of obloquy were soon discovered. Attention drifted away from Amy Wax.

Until a few weeks ago, that is. At some point in March, a social justice vigilante came across an internet video of a conversation between Glenn Loury, a black, anti–affirmative action economics professor at Brown University, and Professor Wax. Titled “The Downside to Social Uplift,” the conversation, which was posted in September, revolved around some of the issues that Professor Wax had raised in her op-ed for the Inquirer. Towards the end of the interview, the painful subject of unintended consequences came up. The very practice of affirmative action, Professor Loury pointed out, entails that those benefitting from its dispensation will be, in aggregate, less qualified than those who do not qualify for special treatment. That’s what the practice of affirmative action means: that people who are less qualified will be given preference over people who are more qualified because of some extrinsic consideration—race, say, or sex or ethnic origin.

Professor Wax agreed and noted that one consequence of this was that those admitted to academic programs through affirmative action often struggle to compete. “I don’t think I’ve ever seen a black student graduate in the top quarter of the class,” Professor Wax said, “and rarely, rarely in the top half.” Professor Wax also observed that the Penn Law Review had an unpublicized racial diversity mandate.

Uh-oh. It took several months for the censors to get around to absorbing this comment. But last month they finally did and the result was mass hysteria. From Ghana to Tokyo to Israel, students associated with Penn Law School were furiously trading emails, tweets, and other social media bulletins about Amy Wax. The university’s Black Law Students Association, whose president, Nick Hall, was instrumental in publicizing the video, went into a swivet. What, they demanded of Dean Ruger, was he going to do about Professor Wax’s outrageous comments?

In a word, capitulate. Then preen. Dean Ruger announced that Professor Wax would henceforth be barred from teaching any mandatory first-year courses. “It is imperative for me as dean to state,” he thundered, “that . . . black students have graduated in the top of the class at Penn Law, and the Law Review does not have a diversity mandate.” Did he offer any data to back that up? No. Perhaps Penn doesn’t keep track. But Dean Ruger may wish to consult a study published in the Stanford Law Review in 2004 which showed that in the most elite law schools, 52 percent of first-year black students pooled in the bottom tenth of their class, compared to 6 percent of whites. Only 8 percent of first-year black students were in the top half of their class.

Lack of data, however, is no impediment to declaring one’s higher virtue while simultaneously caving in to the atavistic forces of political correctness. Amy Wax, intoned Dean Ruger, is “protected by Penn’s policies of free and open expression as well as academic freedom.” Nevertheless, she will be treated as a toxic personality, too dangerous for Penn’s tender shoots embarking on a career in law. “In light of Professor Wax’s statements,” Dean Ruger wrote in a community-wide email,

black students assigned to her class . . . may reasonably wonder whether their professor has already come to a conclusion about their presence, performance, and potential for success in law school and thereafter. They may legitimately question whether the inaccurate and belittling statements she has made may adversely affect their learning environment and career prospects. . . . More broadly, this dynamic may negatively affect the classroom experience for all students regardless of race or background.

As Jason Richwine noted in a column for National Review, Dean Ruger’s protest is “almost Orwellian in its blame-shifting.” All of the issues he lists “are the direct result of Penn’s affirmative-action policies. Those policies generate a racial skills gap in Penn’s first-year law class, and Professor Wax has merely voiced what every rational observer already knows.” Moreover, grading of first-year students at Penn is blind: professors do not know which grade is assigned to which student.

Doubtless Dean Ruger hoped that by scapegoating Amy Wax he would effectively mollify the beast of political correctness. Not likely. As could have been predicted, his capitulation and nauseating Two-Minutes-Hate display of politically correct grandiosity merely sharpened the appetite of the racial grievance mongers. Dean Ruger publicly castigated and in effect demoted Amy Wax. But that was not enough for Asa Khalif, a leader of Black Lives Matter Pennsylvania, who is demanding that she be fired outright. Indeed, he told The Philadelphia Tribune that Penn has one week to comply. “None of what this racist is doing is new to anyone familiar with her,” Khalif said. “Many people have known about her for years. Not just black and brown people, but people who don’t believe she can fairly grade or teach people who don’t look like her. . . . We are unwavering in our one demand that she be fired.”

As we write, L’affaire Wax is still unfolding. Who knows to what lengths Mr. Khalif and his Black Lives Matter thugs are willing to go? Who knows what ecstasies of groveling condemnation Dean Ruger or other Penn administrators may indulge? One thing, however, is clear. The truth is a dispensable commodity at our elite colleges and universities. When it clashes with the imperatives of political correctness, the truth loses. Like the firemen in Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451, most of those populating the higher education establishment are busy destroying the very things they had, once upon a time, been trained to cherish and protect.

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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1267396 2018-03-31T18:30:37Z 2018-03-31T18:30:37Z Rome, Through The Eyes Of Flavius Josephus

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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1267323 2018-03-31T14:51:02Z 2018-03-31T14:51:02Z The Most Astounding Science Facts We've Learnt in 2018 So Far

https://www.sciencealert.com/22-mind-blowing-facts-we-didn-t-know-at-the-start-of-2018


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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1267319 2018-03-31T14:46:12Z 2018-03-31T14:47:24Z The Secret Meaning Behind The Devil's Number 666

https://www.sciencealert.com/what-is-the-secret-meaning-behind-the-devil-s-number-666-mathematics

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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1267202 2018-03-31T01:24:43Z 2018-03-31T01:24:44Z Lockheed Martin...a Fusion Reactor?

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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1267034 2018-03-30T15:50:23Z 2018-03-30T15:50:23Z A Quiet Hero

The Quiet Rescue of America’s Forgotten Fruit

One man is responsible for roughly half of the country’s stone fruit collection.

The Quiet Rescue of America’s Forgotten Fruit
C. Todd Kennedy examines sloe plums.C. Todd Kennedy examines sloe plums. COURTESY OF DAVID KARP

THE EPICENTER OF AMERICA’S TECH industry was once orchards as far as the eye can see. California’s Silicon Valley, as it happens, used to be known as the Valley of Heart’s Delight, a slogan that often accompanied illustrations of sunshine and fruit trees.

The campuses of Google, Facebook, and other businesses have pushed out most fruit growers. But some are left: C. Todd Kennedy is one of California’s premier fruit experts, collectors, and growers. As a co-founder of the Arboreum Company, he distributes rare and vintage fruit trees that produce prickly pears and little-known peaches. But his four-decade dedication to fruit has been remarkably important in another respect: preserving and adding to America’s agricultural legacy. In 2010, horticulturist Clay Weeks estimated that half of the national collection of old stone fruit cultivars come from Kennedy. When asked, Kennedy makes only a slight correction. “Half of the named varieties in the national collection come from me,” he says.

Kennedy’s contribution is the result of a long partnership. The U.S. National Plant Germplasm System has repositories across America, each focused on preserving and researching different types of food plants. The genetic diversity they house may hold the key to overcoming devastating plant diseases (such as the citrus greening currently devastating Florida’s orange crop) or developing fruit cultivars that can withstand climate change.

But these important endeavors can be overlooked and underfunded. In the late eighties and early nineties, Kennedy says, many federal repositories lacked the money or space to receive new genetic material. According to Thomas Gradziel, a University of California, Davis professor and plant breeder, knowledgeable fruit growers (Kennedy chief among them) saved many fruit varieties from disappearing forever.

White apricots, "Mesch Mesch Amra" plumcots, pitangas, "Beauty" plums, and "Shakar Pareh" plumcots from Kennedy's collection.White apricots, “Mesch Mesch Amra” plumcots, pitangas, “Beauty” plums, and “Shakar Pareh” plumcots from Kennedy’s collection. COURTESY OF C. TODD KENNEDY

In a way, fruit is Kennedy’s heritage. “My parents had a large property in Atherton,” Kennedy says. “My father had been raised on a prune and apricot ranch in Los Gatos in the 20’s and 30’s.” (Both towns are in Silicon Valley.) In the 1980s, Kennedy’s father wanted to plant old fruit trees that he remembered from his youth during the Valley of Heart’s Delight days, and he asked Kennedy to help.

But Kennedy wasn’t a horticulturist. He’s an agricultural lawyer who works with farmers on employment and land-use issues. So he turned to state research stations to find his father’s fruits. Many were at what he calls “land-grant” universities established on government land, such as the many campuses of the University of California.

Research stations had maintained collections of fruit trees since the 1880s, but time was short. “I discovered that these land-grant universities were shutting down their orchards,” Kennedy says. He had to work fast to collect the varieties he wanted; others simply vanished. “I got a lot more varieties than was really intended,” he notes. “So I saved them.” Kennedy started collecting cultivars he found to be interesting or “famous old fruits.” That choice turned out to be monumental.

When funding was once again allocated to federal repositories, representatives came to collect twigs and bud sticks from Kennedy. This genetic material is referred to by growers as “germplasm,” and it allows new trees to be propagated and preserved. Kennedy’s contributions helped these institutions fill out their collections.

“I’ve been slowly feeding these varieties to their appropriate repositories,” Kennedy says. Currently, the tally of his donations is 689. He’s donated even more on behalf of members of the California Rare Fruit Growers group, a vast organization of hobbyists. Kennedy says he used to correspond via typewriter with fruit enthusiasts around the country to accumulate interesting cultivars. ‘”Most people are pretty generous,” he says. According to Gradziel, Kennedy is the crucial link between national fruit collections and hobbyist growers.

A week's worth of summer fruit from the Arboreum Company orchard.A week’s worth of summer fruit from the Arboreum Company orchard. COURTESY OF C. TODD KENNEDY

Occasionally, Kennedy even finds rare fruit on the street.

The Santa Clara Valley, despite its current tech focus, is still one of the best fruit-tree growing climates in the world. As a result, a lot of yard fruit goes uneaten and piles up on lawns and sidewalks. Kennedy had long been looking for a tejocote, a type of tree native to Mexico. (Importing its fruit was illegal until recently.) While driving one day, he caught sight of tejocote fruit in a gutter.

“I just followed the line of [tejocote fruit], kind of like Hansel and Gretel,” Kennedy says. With material from that tree, he grew his own tejocote.

Kennedy is no longer a hobbyist. He lives in San Francisco, and the Arboreum Company orchard is two hours south, in Morgan Hill. Now that it’s spring, he’s busy sending saplings to gardeners who want what he calls “older and better fruits.” While Kennedy says his trees come from all over, the greatest number come from the American west. Kennedy’s knowledge of fruit trees and how they grow in California, Gradziel tells me, is just as momentous as the germplasm he’s collected. Kennedy is often referred to for his expertise.

There are challenges to growing rare fruit. “Unfortunately, fruit quality is also connected to other, not-so-good qualities,” Kennedy says. Some fruits with beautiful flavors or interesting stories are more susceptible to disease or less productive than varieties found in grocery stores. And locally adapted fruits don’t grow as well or taste as good elsewhere. The Arboreum Company describes its “Santa Barbara” peach as “designed for those southern Californian areas experiencing a minimum of winter: at the beach and upon the coastal plain.”

The "Beauty" plum in the Arboreum Company orchard.The “Beauty” plum in the Arboreum Company orchard. COURTESY OF C. TODD KENNEDY

The health of Kennedy’s and other private groves is increasingly important, because the federal repositories are once again in trouble. Kennedy believes the current political climate means deep funding cuts are inevitable, while Gradziel describes the Davis branch, which is dedicated to tree fruit, nuts, and grapes, as “in a dire situation right now.” They both believe more money and land is desperately needed to care for and store incoming plants (either as planted trees, cryogenically frozen buds, or preserved seeds).

The trees maintained by Kennedy and other fruit growers serve as “backup collections,” Gradziel says. It’s a matter with international implications. “One of the projects with the Davis repository now is repatriating germplasm that originally came from Afghanistan.” Preserving genetic variety can make all the difference when crops are wiped out by war or disease.

Cherry row at the Arboreum Company orchard.Cherry row at the Arboreum Company orchard. COURTESY OF C. TODD KENNEDY

Even at the Arboreum Company orchard, it’s infeasible to propagate all the trees every year. Instead, Kennedy chooses only a handful. Available fruit trees on the website have poetic descriptions beyond what you’d see in a typical nursery catalog, providing historical and even artistic context. For the Roundel cherry, the description goes:

A variety perhaps as old as the cherry itself. Roundel received its name as the only truly round-fruited sweet cherry, and it remains the prototype cherry of slot machine and cough drop packet … it is figured as “Tondella” in the 1699 oil painting by Bartolomeo Bimbi of cherries grown at the Medici court at Villa di Castello, Tuscany.

The detail is deliberate. Kennedy grows fruit for qualities such as juiciness and taste, but also for their history. “They have a story to be told,” he says. While Kennedy reckons that the Arboreum Company orchard is heavy on customer-favorite peaches at the moment, he doesn’t play favorites. “They’re all equally valuable to me,” he says.

But when pressed, Kennedy name-drops the Imperiale Epineuse prune and Rio Oso Gem peach as particularly special. On the Arboreum Company’s site, the latter is described as “the finest fruit of California.”

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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1266896 2018-03-30T10:39:37Z 2018-03-30T10:39:37Z A friend from Portland, Oregon sent me this. Amuse yourselves by typing in your favorite city and type of bomb.


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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1266424 2018-03-29T10:50:31Z 2018-03-29T10:50:31Z The Literal Translation of Every Country's Name

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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1266326 2018-03-28T23:30:49Z 2018-03-28T23:30:49Z Can a Dictatorship Be A Top World Power?

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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1266003 2018-03-28T02:36:31Z 2018-03-28T02:36:32Z When your plane engine just quits in mid-air

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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1265621 2018-03-26T23:56:42Z 2018-03-26T23:56:42Z How To Meet The Strategic Challenge Posed By China

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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1265334 2018-03-26T10:01:54Z 2018-03-26T10:01:55Z Eggbot: Stroboscopic Patterns For Easter Eggs

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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1264682 2018-03-24T05:47:58Z 2018-03-24T05:47:59Z Hungry yet? ]]> tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1264465 2018-03-23T14:47:39Z 2018-03-23T14:47:40Z Aleksander Doba - The World's Greatest Kayaker

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964 × 354Images may be subject to copyright
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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1264338 2018-03-23T05:03:38Z 2018-03-23T05:03:38Z Attack on Pearl Harbor 1941 - how it happened ]]> tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1264155 2018-03-22T18:29:56Z 2018-03-22T18:29:56Z The 101 Dishes That Changed America

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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1262899 2018-03-19T01:08:58Z 2018-03-19T01:08:58Z Ulaan Baator in Winter (Vivaldi Should Have Been Here)

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tag:para-rigger.posthaven.com,2013:Post/1262442 2018-03-17T18:57:06Z 2018-03-17T18:57:07Z So How Many Roses Go Into A Bottle of Chanel No.5?

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